Домой » News » aKm: "Having the same mindset is a huge advantage for us." | Interview

aKm: "Having the same mindset is a huge advantage for us." | Interview

Dylan “aKm” Bignet is no stranger to the professional Overwatch community. Playing on the wildly successful team Rogue alongside players like Reinforce, TviQ, uNKOE, SoOn, and his brother, Michael “winz” Bignet, he helped the team secure their win at APAC Premiere 2016. In 2017, Rogue took six first place titles, and were sadly unable to secure a team slot in the Overwatch League, so they disbanded, and everyone became a free agent.

Just before Stage Two in the inaugural season of the Overwatch League, aKm got signed on with the Dallas Fuel, and not long after, Scott “Custa” Kennedy was traded to the Los Angeles Valiant for Benjamin “uNKOE” Chevasson. People started to speculate that maybe the old Rogue team was slowly coming back together.

While the old Rogue squad did not return to the Overwatch League on one team, five members did return to this year’s Overwatch World Cup to represent France. After the second day of play in Paris, I sat down with aKm to talk about what it was like playing in front of the home crowd, playing with old friends, and more.

The featured image for this post was provided by Robert Paul for Blizzard Entertainment.


Tatjana: First of all, Congratulations.

aKm: Thank you.

What’s it like playing in front of the French crowd?

So I’ve already experienced that back in 2012, but this was nothing compared to now. I think esports in France have exploded, in a way, so there’s so many fans of us, the French team, right now. Being able to play with a home crowd is amazing, you can feel the energy going through your body. It’s like something magical.

You could feel it in the press room! [Laughs]

Yeah!

You could hear it, the walls would shake.

Now there’s a handful of French players in the Overwatch League, do you feel that kind of funneled into this and all the high-energy? Like the hype from the Overwatch League?

team france

Photo: Robert Paul for Blizzard Entertainment

I’m not sure. Yeah I think players like Poko, SoOn, me and uNKOE, we have a huge fanbase. We’ve been playing the game for two years, back in Rogue we had a huge fanbase as well, so it kind of converted into that.

I’ve never actually experienced that kind of energy in the Overwatch League, it’s not as loud as here, for example. But I think having a lot of fans from the Overwatch League actually helped having that many fans here, as well.

Would you say this was almost more enjoyable than the Overwatch League?

It was, it was. Because Overwatch League is like, many fan are cheering for multiple teams, but they’re not really cheering for you. French fans are like, 95% of the people here are only cheering for one team. So it’s definitely something new, better for me as a player, I think for the whole team as a group.

But yeah, it was definitely a whole different thing.

I’ve noticed that too. Sometimes you’ll see in the press room, in the crowd, you’ll see someone wearing a Dallas Fuel jersey for example, and then they’ll take it off and they’ll be wearing a Nerf Poko shirt underneath. I’ve never understood that in the Overwatch League…  It’s very different, when compared to traditional sports.

Yeah, I think they have favorite players. For example, French people are supporting the French players, so they’re supporting teams with a French player in it – so Valiant, Dallas Fuel and Philadelphia. It’s weird, they have jersey of different teams. It’s amazing to see. It’s growing and growing every year and hopefully in a few years it’s going to be like something even bigger.

Would you like to eventually, potentially play on the same Overwatch League team as Poko, uNKOE, and SoOn?

Yeah, obviously playing with French people… We’ve been friends for a couple of years now, even more for uNKOE, obviously. It’s always amazing. Communication between us is better. Synergy between us is better. Outside of the game is better for us, because we love hanging out with each other, so obviously it would be nice for us. But, can it happen? It’s not really up to us, and it never will be.

That was actually one of my questions – so you come from a team that has Thai speaking people, Korean, English, Finnish… Is there more than that? You guys have a lot of languages, Poko does too…

Yeah.

team france

Photo: Robert Paul for Blizzard Entertainment

SoOn’s team too, has a couple of languages. Was it difficult to transition back to a team that speaks one language or was it easier for you?

It’s kinda difficult. Going from one language is better, because French people, we all have the same mindset, so it’s better for us. For example, in Dallas Fuel, sometimes we struggle because we don’t have the same mindset, we don’t have the same way of working.

For example, French people are known to be very blunt. So if you’re blunt to someone who doesn’t have the same mentality as you, it might sound rude to them and create tension. It’s really hard to work with all the nationalities and try to make it work. In the end, we made it work in the last stage, Stage Four, but in the beginning it was really hard. Having the same mindset is a huge advantage for us.

Absolutely.

Where in France are you originally from?

A city called Angoulême, it’s very close to Bordeaux – like the wine – so it’s not that far.

What’s it like living there, in comparison to living to Los Angeles?

It’s very different. My hometown is pretty much a small city with almost no internet, it’s like… Really small. And Los Angeles next to that is like a huge city with really good internet everywhere. Everything is just way bigger than everything in France. It’s really different, but I’m enjoying my life in Los Angeles so far.

Did you get to visit your family while you were here?

Yeah, right before. We started boot-camping two weeks ago. Right before that, I was actually visiting my family, and I’m going to be visiting them this week too, before I go back to L.A. for BlizzCon. But yeah, I got to see them a little bit.

Out of all the teams that have qualified so far, regardless of what the bracket is, who do you think is the toughest opponent and why?

Well obviously South Korea, because they have the best players in the world in every position. But this year, I don’t think that they’re unbeatable. Last year, you could see that USA, even us, started to get really close to beating them. So I think this year we can beat them, but they are going to be the favorites by far. And probably USA right behind them.

And my last question for you is are you going to be taking any time off after all this, before BlizzCon, or are you just going to grind?

I’m going to take the week off to see my family before I go back to L.A., but then the grind is going to be back, and I’m going to be grinding until BlizzCon, and hopefully be good enough to beat anyone.

Awesome, well thank you so much for your time, and good luck.

Thank you.

Проверьте также

Believe The Hype: Team Australia, Underdogs Supreme

Believe The Hype: Team Australia, Underdogs Supreme

We only made it thanks to Sweden. Even though they failed to qualify, the Swedes …